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KBCS Summer Fund Drive

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$40,000 Goal

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Drive ends: June 30, 2022

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Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women – A Series of Six Stories

A report released by the Urban Indian Health Institute in 2018 shows that over 500 cases of missing or murdered indigenous women have been found throughout the United States – many since the year 2000. 70 women had gone missing or were murdered in Seattle and Tacoma. 6 were reported in Portland. How are indigenous families impacted by this and how are our communities coming together to help? (more…)

Targets of this Region’s Sex Trafficking Industry

Danica Childs went missing from Federal Way in 2007.  She was 17 years old at the time.  KBCS’s Kevin Henry interviews Sarah Childs, Danica’s stepmother about the family’s experience in searching for Danica Childs.

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Montgomery Bus Boycott

the Montgomery Bus Boycott was led by Black women of Montgomery after the court trial of four Montgomery women forced, on separate occasions, to give up their bus seat to a white passenger.  This movement ended segregation on buses. (more…)

Domestic Violence – How We Might Help

 

December 10th is Human Rights Day.  The United Nations and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) declare domestic violence as a violation of women’s human rights.  Domestic violence survivor advocate, Emy Johnston discusses how one might help someone they think is being abused in this story.

API CHAYA  M-F 10 am to 4 pm 1-877-922-4292/206-325-0325

National Domestic Violence Hotline 24 hours everyday chatting available on their website 1-800-799-7233

National Human Trafficking Hotline 24 hours everyday 1-888 -373-7888

King County Sexual Assault Resource Center 24 hours everyday 1-888-998-6423

Producers: Yuko Kodama and Jesse Callahan
Image: United Nations

Black Panther Party Women

The Black Panther Party was active in Seattle, offering protection and services for the local black community.  Services included a free breakfast program which fed hundreds of children in Seattle, and a free health clinic, today monikered as the Carolyn Downs clinic in Seattle’s Central District.   The women of the Black Panther Party were a force behind the movement.  (more…)

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women 6 – Women Are Water Carriers

The Prayer Skirt, a long skirt adorned with ribbons, is ceremonial regalia for the Plains tribes.  During the demonstration against the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock, indigenous women of many different tribes began to wear the prayer skirt at ceremony in solidarity with the Plains Tribes women.

Prayer skirts, have also been adopted into events calling for more awareness and support for families of missing and murdered indigenous women.  KBCS’s Yuko Kodama spoke with Noel Parrish, a member of the crane clan of the turtle mountain band of Chippewa Indians, about  the relationship of the prayer skirts,  missing and murdered indigenous women and the struggle to protect our waters from the fossil fuel industry.

Special thanks to Jim Cantu for additional help with editing this story

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women 5 – Kristen Millares Young’s Investigative Article

Misty Upham was a successful indigenous actress from the Blackfeet Nation, winning roles alongside stars like Benicio Del Torro in the Cannes Film Festival acclaimed Jimmy P: Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian, and Ewan MacGregor in August: Osage county.  Misty Upham also went missing on October 5th 2014.  Her body was found in Auburn, Washington by her friends and family eleven days later.

Kristen Millares Young is a freelance journalist for the Washington Post and the current prose writer in residence at Hugo House.  Millares Young wrote an investigative article for the Guardian about Misty Upham’s case in 2015.  SHe shared what she came away with in an interview with Jim Cantu for KVRU LPFM Radio.

Photo Credit to Natalie Shields

Special thanks to Jesse Callahan for help with editing this story

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women 4 – A Story of a Missing Aunt

A report released by the Urban Indian Health Institute in 2018 shows that over 500 cases of missing or murdered indigenous women have been found throughout the United States –  many since the year 2000. 70 women had gone missing or were murdered in Seattle and Tacoma. 6 were reported in Portland. KBCS’s Yuko Kodama interviewed Kayla Crocker of Chemanis First Nations about her journey of looking for her aunt, who had gone missing.

 

 

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women 2 – Prayer Skirt Sewing Circle

Indigenous women have taken the lead in increasing awareness of the high numbers of their sisters who go missing and die to violence.  KBCS’s Yuko Kodama takes you to a red skirt sewing circle, a community building event which builds support for, honors, and assists in the healing of the community mourning their missing and murdered indigenous women.  Thanks to Jesse Callahan for help with editing.

 

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91.3 KBCS music and ideas listener supported radio from Bellevue College.

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Indigenous women have taken the lead in increasing awareness of the high numbers of their sisters who go missing and die to violence. Roxanne White from the earlier story organized a community building event with the focus of supporting indigenous women. KBCS’s Yuko Kodama went to the gathering and brought back this story.

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I walked into a small church in Renton, there’s a large spread of food and drinks in the corner, a potluck. A handful of kids chase each other in the hallway and under tables. The table tops are covered with sewing machines and brightly colored material. On the walls are posters with photos of women. There’s bold lettering saying “missing”, then the woman’s name, and the date and place of their last sighting. The event is a red skirt sewing circle. It’s a community building event for women to come together to sew ribbon skirts. This sewing circle was themed for missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls. A group of about 11 women and youth work away at measuring, cutting and sewing fabric to make the skirts – an a-line long skirt decorated with brightly colored ribbons and patterns. This ribbon skirt or prayer skirt is ceremonial regalia of the plains tribes. Noel Parrish is from the plains area. She’s from the Crane Clan of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians. Parrish describes what the prayer skirt represents.

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We wear our skirt because we, as women, as life givers, are sacred. Our colors connects us to the Mother Earth and who we are as women, as life givers. And so we choose our colors so that creator knows who we are.

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I’m no expert. I’m a Yakama woman, but the way I feel about it is is that when I put this skirt on, it’s sacred. And it’s a covering. It’s a protection. It’s who I am as a woman is an indigenous woman, a native woman.

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That was Roxanne White from the Yakama, Nez Perce, Nooksack, and Gros Ventre tribes. White is a leader in the missing and murdered Indigenous women movement. She’s also the organizer of the sewing circle. The ribbons, skirts are plains tribes regalia. Indigenous women from other tribes began wearing them in solidarity with the tribes at Standing Rock. The skirts have taken on an additional life, as a symbol of prayer and solidarity among women, which is relevant at this event: the red skirt sewing circle.

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Women’s skirts is becoming a thing where women, from all tribes, from all nations, are excited to make their own ribbon skirt. We decided to have this event open because of the importance of solidarity and how we all work together as one people. This is good medicine. It’s for each one of these women and their children and their families. Even the little kids, even the little girls went and picked out their material and whatever they saw themselves wearing. And then they’ll learn and when they wear it, they’re going to feel proud because they’re wearing culture. And that’s what it’s all about.

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So the women at the red skirt sewing circle are building a nurturing support network for each other amidst the growing number of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. For KBCS. This is Yuko Kodama.

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The red skirt sewing circle was held in December of 2018.

 

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women 1 – What’s Needed

Roxanne White, of the Yakama, Nez Perce, Nooksack and Gros Ventre tribes, is an activist who advocates for the families of missing and murdered women (MMIW).  KBCS’s Yuko Kodama spoke with White about the MMIW movement at an indigenous prayer skirt sewing circle organized as a community building event in honor of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women.

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