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Drive ends: June 17, 2024

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DREAMers Moms Tijuana – Yolanda Varona

In 2011, Yolanda Varona was unexpectedly separated from her children at the end of a trip across the border.  She was deported to Mexico.

As Varona found ways to connect with her children and worked toward being with them again, she helped other deported mothers to find services and resources.  Varona became the Founder and Director of DREAMers Moms in Tijuana, Mexico, as many of the women, Varona worked with were mothers of children with US citizenship or qualify for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), otherwise known as DREAMers.

In 2019, Mari McMenamin, Dana Schuerholz and I traveled to San Diego, California and Tijuana, Mexico to cover border stories and listened to Varona’s story of deportation and efforts to connect with her daughter. 

Producers: Mari McMenamin, Laura Florez. Special thanks to Magdaleno Rose-Avila of Building Bridges for inspiring us to pick up this story and for connecting us to the speakers.

Photos: Dana Schuerholz, Mari McMenamin

  

 

   

 

 

All You Need is a Good Heart

What does it take to effectively demonstrate for human rights?  Community organizer and writer, Magdaleno ‘Leno’ Rose-Avila reflects on his first protest in high school. (more…)

A Day of Remembrance – A Week of Action

Each February, Japanese American communities nationwide observe the Day of Remembrance, the anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 which led to the mass incarceration of over 120,000 Japanese Americans across the west coast during World War II.

Some survivors of this incarceration and their descendants fight mass incarceration today, because of their community’s experiences during that time. You’ll hear from Tsuru for Solidarity, an organization of Japanese American activists, and La Resistencia, a group advocating for immigrants detained today. Interviews are with Stan Shikuma, Co-chair of Tsuru for Solidarity’s children and family detention campaign and Maru Mora Villalpando, Founder of La Resistencia.

Producer: Yuko Kodama

Friday, February 16
9am
Press Conference
Federal Building 915 2nd Ave Seattle
Virtual Rally
Zoom bit.ly/3HWgwN4
Instagram Live @tsuruforsolidarity

Sunday, February 18
Program
1pm Washington State Fairgrounds’ Agriplex 5th St SW Puyallap
2:30pm Northwest Detention Center 1623 E J St Tacoma

Tuesday, February 20
10am
Press Conference
King County Airport Main Terminal 7277 Perimeter Rd S Seattle

Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Day

 
On Wednesday Feb. 7, the Washington Immigrant Solidarity Network (WAISN) and many immigrants and allies will gather at the state capitol building for a rally in support of WAISN’s 2024 immigrant justice campaigns.  The campaigns are for Health Equity for Immigrants to provide equal access to healthcare for all low-income Washingtonians, regardless of their immigration status, and Unemployment Insurance for Undocumented Workers to create a permanent, separate unemployment system that provides benefits to undocumented workers.
 
The Olympia City Council will also sign a proclamation designating February 7, 2024 as Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Day.
 
KBCS spoke with WAISN Executive Director, Catalina Velasquez about the work by immigrants and allies in the movement of advocating for immigrant communities, the campaigns and the event.
 
Producer: Yuko Kodama
Photo: WAISN

On the Ground in Poland to help Ukrainians Fleeing War

What’s happening on the ground in Poland where Ukrainians are fleeing to by the thousands? A local Sammamish resident and his brother are there to help.

Here is information on their project, Suitcases for Ukraine.

Producer: Yuko Kodama

Photo Credit: Lance and Thury Foster

KBCS Border Stories – Living Undocumented

How does being undocumented impact your life? Does it impact where you go shopping for groceries, where you rent your apartment, whether you drive or buy a car or have access to a cell phone? Dulce Garcia, Executive Director of Border Angels, speaks to how being undocumented shaped who she is today.

(more…)

Japanese American Elders Protest the Northwest Detention Center

Japanese American elders, their children and grandchildren, and many others held a protest at the Northwest Detention Center on Sunday, February 23rd.  It was a partnership between Tsuru for Solidarity, Densho, Seattle Japanese American Citizens League and La Resistencia.  This story looks at the generational impact incarceration has on families.

Tsuru for Solidarity is preparing for a pilgrimage on Washington DC from June 5 -7.

Full Story:

Many protesters gathered at Tacoma’s Northwest Detention Center, one of the largest ICE detention facilities in the nation.  KBCS’ Sam Britt was there in heavy rain, and brings you this story.

I’m here at Tsuru for Solidarity’s Day of Remembrance and Action outside the Northwest Detention Center.

Despite the rain and the wind, before long, the streets outside of the Northwest detention center were flooded with people. huddled under umbrellas and tents surrounding the stage. Protesters activist and concerned citizens waited patiently for the events to formally begin. The crowd is filled with Japanese American elders that once faced incarceration by the United States, as well as the children and families of migrants that today face deportation or incarceration at facilities like the one here in Tacoma NW DC is one of the largest immigrant detention facilities in the country, owned and operated by the for profit corporation GEO Group. Inside, more than 1400 undocumented immigrants are housed, many of them for an undetermined period of time. The Japanese American group Tsuru for Solidarity organize the event today to protest the separation and incarceration of migrant families – something the Japanese community in the United States bears painful memories of.

James Arima: “I was born surrounded by barbed wire and guard cars in Crystal City, Texas. My father was separated from my mother and older siblings for almost three years. And I’m a product of the reunion. You know, and uh… I know that my father never recovered emotionally or economically from what was done to him. And my older siblings, people their age have memories of being incarcerated, but they claim they don’t. And I think it… it comes out in other ways from their suppressed memories. You don’t find them at events like this. I’m hopeful that someday they will because for many attending events like this it’s a healing.”

That’s James Arima, a survivor of the Japanese internment camps. He shared with me the lasting effects, discrimination and mass incarceration have had on him, his family and his generation growing up post World War Two. Dr. Satsuki. Ina is a Psychotherapist and founding member of Tsuru For Solidarity. She’s also a survivor of internment herself, and has devoted her life to studying the generational trauma her community still suffers with.

Can you describe to me your work and what you’ve discovered about group trauma,

Satsuki Ina: “Right. So, you know, collective historic trauma is something that has been inflicted on multiple groups of people of color in America. And particularly, my concern has been about children who are in this constant state of fear, separation, incarceration themselves, that when the nervous system and the brain is developing, to be in that state, actually alters physiologically, the brain functioning – so the child then grows up with a lot of anxiety and easily triggered defensive responses because of that. It’s influenced by culture too, so in my community, lots of anxiety and depression.”

And group trauma can touch more than just those who experienced the traumatic event. Its effects can be seen for generations to come. Mike, Ishii is a spoken word artist, and another founder of Tsuru For Solidarity, and the son of parents who went through the horrors of incarceration.

Mike Ishii: “What is confusing for us who were not incarcerated, but our descendants, is that we feel the trauma that was passed down through our parents to us. – and yet, it’s not happening, so you don’t understand why you have terrible anxiety, why you have panic attacks, why you lack confidence, why you feel so driven to have to do things perfectly, because after the war when they tried to come back into society, my family was targeted with violence. They shot our windows out, they spray painted death threats in front of the house. They would wait till my father left for work and they would call my mother and say, j*^ b#*@*, We’re going to come kill you now,”

And who was they?

Mike Ishi: “Our white neighbors and SeaTac”

…music…

There was pain here today. The now elderly children of incarcerated Japanese Americans remembered their loved ones lost, and the damage done to their families and communities. …And the still young children and wives of incarcerated migrants held by on the tall grey walls and barbed wire of the Northwest detention center remembered the faces of those they’d had taken from them.

There was also hope. Children folded paper cranes. Tsurus, in Japanese, a symbol for peace, compassion and hope. People played music beat drums, read poetry, chanted and remembered…Tsuru For solidarity is planning their largest action yet in Washington DC this June.

….music….

The violin you just heard was Kishi Bashi. I’m Sam Britt. Thanks to Yuko Kodama for help with editing.

LGBTQ Immigration Detention in Washington State

As of January 28th, Washington’s Northwest Detention Center is intentionally housing LGBTQ detainees. Monserrat Padilla Co-Director of the Washington Immigrant Solidarity Network (WAISN) describes the efforts to protect this population of immigrants.

Producer: Yuko Kodama

Photo: torbakhopper

Skagit Valley Farmworkers and ICE

US Immigrations and Customs Enforcement Agents arrested 24 year old Medardo Cruz-Ventura on January 24th.    Edgar Franks, Political Director of Familias Unidas por la Justicia describes how ICE activities impact Washington’s Skagit Valley where farmworkers make up 30% of the population.

The Northwest Detention Center and The City of Tacoma

Demonstrators demanding the shut down of the Northwest Detention Center disrupted a Tacoma City Council hearing on Tuesday.  It was organized by La Resistencia and supported by more than a dozen other local organizations.  KBCS’s Samuel Britt was there to give us a snapshot of why the protestors were there that afternoon.