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Summer Fund Drive Progress

The on-air portion of our fund drive is over, but you can still help KBCS reach its goal by donating before June 30th. Please make a gift in support of your favorite KBCS programs today, and thank you in advance!

$65,000 Goal

62.15%

Drive ends: June 30, 2024

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Living in an Eastern WA Wildfire Season

 
Laura Ackerman lives on a hobby farm on the eastern side of West Plains near Spokane.  She’s also an environmental organizer and Co-host of the radio program Earth Matters Now airing on KYRS community radio in Spokane.  Ackerman shares a resident’s perspective on the wildfires in Eastern Washington. 
 
Producer: Yuko Kodama
Photo: cropped from KYRS photo
 
 

Navigating How to Help After the Maui Wildfire

 
A wildfire on Maui engulfed the town of Lahaina on August 8th and 9th.  With over 100 people dead in the aftermath, this event has been pronounced the deadliest blaze in U.S. modern history. 
 
A large population of people from Hawaii live in the Pacific Northwest.  This interview with Gail Stringer of Hawaii General Store and Gallery is a local perspective on response to the tragedy. 
 
Producer: Yuko Kodama
 
Photo: Hawaii General Store
 

Basing Summer Plans on Wildfires

Summer wildfires are the new face of catastrophic climate change in Washington and much of the West. As summer 2019 unfolds, those who can, are making plans to become seasonal climate refugees to escape the smoke and unhealthy air. Find out what options there are who can’t leave town.

Producers: Martha Baskin and Daniel Guenther
Photo: Charles Luce

The Long Shadow of Fires in the Northwest

After two years of some of the worst fires and smoke the Northwest has ever seen, Washington’s Methow Valley is catching its breath. Dozens of businesses didn’t make it through. And as correspondent Anna King reports, the fires still throw a long shadow.

Left: Kathleen Jardin owns Methow Valley’s Central Reservations and an art gallery. She says she’s hoping more people return to the valley for family vacations, reunions and weddings.

Into the Black: A Close-Up of What Was Lost in the Range 12 Wildfire

In southeast Washington, the Range 12 wildfire is good and out. But now there’s 176,600 acres of black. Much of the valuable habitat on the Hanford Reach National Monument has been roasted. Correspondent Anna King took this journey — into the black.

Left: In southeast Washington, the Range 12 wildfire burned 176-thousand acres. Much of that was on the Hanford Reach National Monument. Experts say dust storms and mud flows will be a problem until the land heals back.