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KBCS Summer Fund Drive

The on-air portion of our Summer Fund Drive has come to an end, but there's still time to help KBCS reach its fund drive goal before June 30th! Please make your contribution today and thank you in advance!

$40,000 Goal

76.28%

Drive ends: June 30, 2022

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Montgomery Bus Boycott

the Montgomery Bus Boycott was led by Black women of Montgomery after the court trial of four Montgomery women forced, on separate occasions, to give up their bus seat to a white passenger.  This movement ended segregation on buses. (more…)

Confederate Symbols

KBCS went to New Orleans with Project Pilgrimage participants in 2018 and learned about the movement to dismantle confederate monuments throughout the country. 91 3’s Ruthie Bly dives into the history of confederate symbols and what to do with a confederate legacy that just won’t concede defeat. (more…)

Project Pilgrimage – Medgar Evers

The NAACP’s first Mississippi field secretary, Medgar Evers was a civil rights leader who organized voter-registration efforts, economic boycotts, and investigated crimes perpetrated against blacks in the south. (more…)

Project Pilgrimage: The Last Slave Ship to the United States

In May, the wreckage of the last slave ship to the United States was confirmed found off the shores of Mobile Alabama.  Attorney, Justice, and Historian, Karlos Finley, explains the significance of the slaveship, Clotilda, for the descendants of those enslaved people transported here inside it  in 1860. Finley also describes the remarkable community that many of the people who came on that ship created in Africa Town, Alabama. (more…)

Project Pilgrimage: 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

On September 15th, 1963, the 16th Street Baptist Church was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan, killing four young girls. This bombing marked a turning point in the United States during the Civil Rights Movement, and contributed to support for passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. Carolyn McKinstry was 15 years old at the time, and was in the building when the bomb exploded. Dr. McKinstry addressed participants of Project Pilgrimage, an immersive civil rights journey about that day in 2018.

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Project Pilgrimage: Dr LaFayette- Equal Justice

90 years ago Tuesday January 15th 1929 Martin Luther King Jr. was born. At the age of 26 he became a key leader in the modern American Civil Rights Movement. He is well known for promoting non-violence. A way of life that Dr. Bernard LaFayette Jr., who worked with Dr. King, promotes to this day.

While in the Seattle area last year with Project Pilgrimage, Dr. LaFayette sat down with 91 3’s Ruthie Bly in a restaurant and shared the difference between non-violence and equal justice.

Dr. Bernard LaFayette worked closely with Dr. King and carries on his legacy today with Kingian Nonviolence training. He also chairs the board of another Dr. King legacy: the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.
Special thanks to Project Pilgrimage for arranging the interview.

A Project Pilgrimage Unmute the Commute: Freedom Rides

We ride buses so easily today that we may forget our nation’s history just 60 years ago. Today on Unmute the Commute, join us on a Freedom Ride. Produced by former KBCS News Director Sonya Green and Winona Hollins Hauge of Project Pilgrimage. Former Freedom Rider Dr. Bernard Lafayette will be in Seattle on April 21st and 22nd to present a workshop on non-violence. More details to attend.

Photo Credit: Perry Aycock, Brittanica

Unmute the Commute is a weekly series highlighting commuter stories, supported in part by King County Metro’s Just One Trip.